Female Hormones: Replace or Rebalance?

Modern medicine approaches female hormone care with a pharmaceutically and surgically based point of view that aims to eliminate symptoms. Treatment is considered successful if the symptoms are reduced or eliminated. This is accomplished by stimulating, suppressing or replacing some bodily function or removing the offending organ. The need for at least looking at a different approach is underscored by some alarming statistics regarding the rampant use of prescription drugs. Prescription drugs taken as prescribed in hospitals are now the fourth leading cause of death in Canada, after cancer, heart disease and strokes. Annually, five times more Canadians die from supervised prescription drug use than from automobile accidents. That statistic doubles if you include deaths from unsupervised use of prescription pharmaceuticals and over the counter medications, including Tylenol, Aspirin, and Ibuprofen.* Do our medicine shelves actually hold more potential danger than a gun cabinet? In addition to side effects (some evidence of increased cancer risk), the estrogen and progestin in hormone replacement therapies, as well as contraceptives, deplete key nutrients such as B vitamins and minerals (zinc, magnesium, and selenium), the amino acid tyrosine, and even healthy gut bacteria. Let’s consider the point of view that a woman’s body is designed to be healthy and self-healing.   Given the correct support and supply, it will self-balance. This approach is not new. True traditional medicine has been around for centuries. What can a woman do to support her body so that it produces the hormones she needs internally instead of taking an external source such as with hormone replacement drugs? The female hormone system is designed to balance and sustain itself...

HORMONES – What About Men?

Last month we talked about Estrogen dominance and the fact that it may be somewhat epidemic for both genders. I am addressing this topic again from the male side of the issue because it is less talked about, and because the entire topic of hormone imbalance is greatly misunderstood. The vast majority of men are surprised to learn that estrogens are present in their bodies and that at low levels this “female” hormone actually contributes positively to their long-term health and well-being.   Male estrogens are essential for a solid libido, optimum brain function, healthy heart and strong bones, and are naturally produced in small quantities as a bi product of testosterone metabolism or conversion. Elevated male estrogen levels on the other hand, can lead to reduced strength and lean muscle mass loss, excessive body fat, especially in the chest and belly, hair loss, enlarged prostate and a decreased ability to produce testosterone. Men will usually notice a decrease in their youthfulness, vitality and sex drive. What causes this estrogen-testosterone imbalance? The stress of modern life, use of medications and alcohol, intake of emasculating foreign estrogenic-like compounds in processed, packaged foods (and even in our water supply) exposure to environmental contaminants, and excess body fat (which stimulates the production of even more estrogen) are all co contributors. Unfortunately, unless testosterone level tests show severely lowered levels, there is not much attention given to treatment for the great majority of men who suffer from mild or moderate symptoms of hormone imbalance. So, it is usually chalked up to “normal aging.” And the usual intervention in the form of replacement with synthetic...

Are You Estrogen Dominant?

Estrogen dominance is a term John Lee, M.D.1 created to refer to an all too common and potentially dangerous type of hormonal imbalance. In short, it is too much estrogen relative to the amount of progesterone. Estrogen dominance is not just a female problem. Take a minute to score yourself with the following checklist: _____sore, swollen breasts, breast tenderness (for women or men) _____swollen fingers and ankles, _____ feeling impatient or bossy, _____fatigue _____aging process accelerating _____allergies, including asthma, hives, rashes, sinus congestion _____autoimmune disorders (including lupus erythematosis, thyroiditis) _____blood sugar disturbances, especially low blood sugar _____breast cancer _____cold hands and feet (a symptom of t1hyroid dysfunction) _____decreased sex drive _____depression with anxiety or agitation _____dry eyes _____fat gain, especially around the abdomen, hips, and thighs _____fibrocystic breasts(women or men) _____gallbladder disease _____hair loss _____headaches _____hypoglycemia _____inability to focus _____increased blood clotting (increasing risk of strokes) _____infertility _____irritability _____insomnia _____memory loss _____mood swings _____sluggish metabolism _____water retention, bloating _____history of xenoestrogen exposure when you were an embryo (from your mother eating foods containing DDT or taking DES (diethylstilbestrol), a drug used to prevent miscarriage) For women, do you or did you: _____take birth control pills _____take conventional ERT (estrogen replacement therapy) _____take HRT (hormone replacement therapy) _____undergo a tubal ligation _____develop fibrocystic breasts _____have irregular periods or no periods _____uterine fibroids _____uterine cancer _____pass clots during your period _____out of control bleeding _____cervical dysplasia _____endometriosis _____endometrial polyps _____early onset of menstruation _____PMS (premenstrual syndrome) _____menstrual pain _____suffer miscarriage _____premenopausal bone loss   What Your Score Means: Regardless of your gender, the higher your score, the more likely you have estrogen...