How Can We Cope With Forest Fire Smoke?

Forest fires throughout the BC interior have exposed us all to health risks from breathing smoky air and many people are concerned about the potential harm to their health. Humans have been dealing with smoke from fire for eons. As a result, there is a wealth of indigenous information as well as modern science from which to draw advice. A recent study done on sheep showed that smoke inhalation can deplete Vitamin E.  Another study showed that the amino acid L-Arginine had a protective effect on the lungs after inhaling smoke. We know that Vitamin C has a protective effect on the lungs.   Vitamin A and zinc are two other well known agents of tissue repair. To maintain the integrity of the alveoli in your lungs, think of them as little soap bubbles that remain flexible, strong and elastic if they have enough surfactant., which is a lipid or fat.  The best fats for building healthy alveoli are the saturated fats found in animal foods, (butter, lard, etc.) and in tropical oils such as coconut and palm oil, and in olive oil.  One should avoid the trans fats found in partially hydrogenated oils such as margarine, shortening, (often in commercial baked goods), and deep fried fast foods.  Trans fats compromise the integrity of the alveoli. What are some best foods for supplying important nutrients for your respiratory health? Beets help to digest good fats and supply lots of minerals and vitamins needed for repair. Betaine is a very useful enzyme found in beets and is also in most dark leafy greens. Perfect timing for the home gardener. Some good...