Make No Bones About It – Part 2

Bone Health is a growing concern.  The statistics are staggering!  In the over 50 age group, one in every 2 women and every 8th man will experience a fracture due to weakened bones.  Why is this happening?  Bone tissue is meant to be strong, resilient and long-lasting.  Ask any archeologist.  Bones tell the story of how we have lived our lives long after we have left our bodies…  So why this rampant and prolific problem of poor bone health nowadays? The most extreme example of osteoporosis I can think of is the historical story of scurvy.  In the days of the pirate ships, when men became severely ill due to malnourishment and dehydration, the captain would have their bodies shaken – If their bones rattled it meant they were riddled with fractures and beyond saving.  They were tossed overboard for fish bait.  The happy part of this story is that when given limes to eat (thus the term “limey” for the British seamen) this problem was prevented.  What can we learn from this story? Bone health is a dynamic process just like all body processes. As bone cells die, new ones are grown. Just how much growth is determined by the principle of supply and demand?  So generally, people who place more demand on their bones through regular activity will generate new bone production provided they have the raw materials to handle the construction chore. That’s where nutrition comes in.  Your body wants needs and thrives on “WHOLE FOODS”.  Anything else creates metabolic stress, imbalance and a tendency for the body to pull out stored minerals from the bones.  You’ll notice that the British used a whole food to solve their scurvy problem, not one single nutrient such as...

Make No Bones About It – Part 1

  Health – Can You Feel It In Your Bones?    Scientist say if you are fair skinned, small boned, with a family history of bone disease or are of European or Asian descent, especially female gender, you may have a predisposition for osteoporosis.   There goes the neighborhood.  These risk factors are as omnipresent as Tim Horton franchises in B.C.  It’s enough to make one think “I knew I should have picked a better family.”   Statistics can be discouraging when you can’t change the risk factors.  However just knowing your risks might be of help in the choices you make for your life, just as if you knew there was a high risk of a cold winter coming you could take steps to prepare for it.   Actually there are more than 80 warning signs for this “supposedly silent” condition, according to Pamela Levin, R.N., author of the book Perfect Bones.   Included are such things as  sudden insomnia, soft teeth, nightly leg cramps, dowager’s hump, back pain, being a smoker (no surprise), morning stiffness…to name a few.  Any one of these things, says Levin, is significant to signal the risk of osteoporosis.   I don’t know about you, but 80 wake-up calls seem to me like being hit over the head with a hammer.  How could we not get the message?   Bone weakness and loss is just another indicator of long term malnutrition and sedentary lifestyle.  Many people think osteoporosis is an adult-only disease when in fact it really begins in early childhood with one’s food and activity choices.   When did you start to drink pop and sugary snacks and omit raw vegetables and whole foods...